The Secret for Making Dry Shampoo Work for You

You know those days—we all have them. Playing tag with the snooze button, losing track of time on the treadmill, too much to do with too little time, and now, you’re in a rush to get out the door. Sometimes we’re just lazy girls (or guys), and the idea of going through the routine of washing, blow drying and styling your hair is too much! There are lots of reasons why doing your hair can be a bit of a burden at times, but the thought of going out into the world with flat, greasy, second-day hair isn’t really a good option.


Conair Introduces a Powered Dry Shampoo Brush

There is a solution out there for those of us looking for a hairstyling shortcut on days when time or motivation are in short supply. It’s called dry shampoo, and although there are lots of new products on the market, the original concept is anything but new. More about that later.

Before we get down to the nitty gritty, let’s let the cat out of the bag! The key to successful use of dry shampoos is in the brushing. Dry shampoos must be distributed evenly throughout your hair. This is accomplished by proper application of the powder followed by effective brushing and working of the powder onto the scalp and down to the roots of the hair. An ordinary hairbrush requires a lot of effort to achieve even distribution. So, Conair® has created a better way, the Conair® Hair Remedy Dry Shampoo Brush.

The Hair Remedy brush is battery powered to provide a stimulating hair and scalp massage. Used with a dry shampoo, it works the powder down into the roots of your hair distributing it evenly with a minimum of effort. It easily detangles and revives second day hair. This innovative brush also features an ion generator which helps reduce frizz due to static electricity. Now you can wake-up-and-go on those days when time is tight or your incentive is a tad under the weather.

Keep in mind that the Hair Remedy brush is not just for use with dry shampoo. It serves as an excellent after shower detangler and it’s great when you’re on the go. Pull it out of your purse for a quick brushing to smooth your hair wherever you are and whenever you need it. Plus, as a gentle scalp massager, it’s hard to beat. The cushioned bristles are rounded at the tips and the bristle bar is removeable for easy cleaning.


What is Dry Shampoo and What Does It Do?

Dry shampoo isn’t actually shampoo at all. It’s a powder you apply to your hair that absorbs the oils from your scalp and hair. When brushed through vigorously, it leaves your hair looking and feeling cleaner. It is not meant to replace regular washing because dry shampoo does not actually clean your hair. So, how does dry shampoo work? It reduces the tackiness of oily moisture in your hair through absorption thereby producing more volume and a fresher look and feel. It’s great for use in a pinch when there’s no time for a wash and dry, such as after a gym workout, when traveling, on camping trips or after a visit to the beach. Some dry shampoos contain a touch of fragrance to help mask odors.

A woman spraying dry shampoo onto her hair.

The Real Secret to Making it Work

For those who have tried dry shampoo and found the experience to be less than desirable, it is important to note that there are a few tricks to be aware of that will give you an advantage when trying to make dry shampoo work for you.

First, applying the powder to your hair requires a bit of dexterity. It is critical that it is applied and distributed evenly throughout your hair. Avoid letting clumps of powder to form when sprinkling or spraying the powder into your hair. Trying to even out these clumps with an ordinary hairbrush can be difficult requiring excessive brushing which can introduce stress and damage to hair strands and scalp.

Hold the dry shampoo container a good 8 inches or more from your scalp as you apply. This will enable the powder to disperse and fall more evenly into the hair. And, be careful not to use too much. Excess powder will create a dull, chalky appearance. Always start with a little—it’s always easier to add more if you feel your hair is still too oily. Also, keep in mind that dry shampoo comes in different shades of color—lighter colors for blondes and darker ones for brunettes, so look for the one that works best for you.

Woman uses the dry shampoo brush to work the shampoo into her hair.

Second, use a massaging hair brush with vibrating bristles, such as the Hair Remedy Dry Shampoo Brush from Conair to disperse the powder evenly onto the scalp and down to the hair roots. The vibrating bristles distribute the dry shampoo uniformly throughout the hair with minimal effort while gently massaging the scalp for a relaxing and stress reducing experience. It’s best not to use your fingers to blend the powder into your hair because your hands can add skin oils to your hair making the condition worse.

Third, don’t make beginner’s mistakes! These include holding the container too close to your head when applying the powder, applying too much of it, and not massaging the powder into your hair and scalp enough until it disappears. That’s where the Conair Hair Remedy brush can really help. It does most of the work for you and you get a relaxing scalp massage at the same time.

Woman demonstrates how the bristle section can be removed from the brush body for cleaning.

Also, avoid the biggest mistake of all—using it too many days in a row. Ideally, it’s best not to rely on dry shampoo for more than two days, three at most if you’re really in a jam. Some users claim they’ve used it on camping trips for as many as five days and their hair still looked good. It really depends on how oily your hair is. Regardless, you’ll probably know when it’s time to jump in the shower and lather up with real shampoo and conditioner.

The Interesting and Amusing History of Dry Shampoo

Remember hearing about powdered wigs in history class? Back in the 18th century, men wore them. They were fashionable and, as you might imagine, bathing and showering were not practiced as frequently as they are today. Since most people did not wash their hair very often, diseases causing hair loss and rashes lead to the use of wigs to hide these ailments. So, powdered wigs were treated with animal fats and then dusted with wheat flour, corn meal or dried white clay to keep them looking fresh. Fragrances, such as lavender, rose petal, nutmeg and jasmine were added to cover stale odors.

A painting titled Englishman In Paris depicts a man applying powder to the wig of an 18th Century gentleman.

Take a look at George Washington on the dollar bill. Looks like a powdered wig, right? It's not! George preferred his own real hair, but he had it powdered by his personal valet, just like a wig. The more affluent households had “powder rooms” for the daily application of the wig (or real hair) dressings.

Commercial dry shampoo products have been around for a while. An ad for a product named Marcel Fluff can be found in newspapers dating back as far as 1907. Another one called Minipoo® was introduced in the early 1940s and advertised using the slogan, "When you can't shampoo, Minipoo." The marketers focused on women and it became known as the 10-minute dry shampoo. A few of the advertising pitches suggested that Minipoo was great for use while sick in bed, or for "surprise dates," when there was no time to get ready, and that it was approved by children because no soap would get in their eyes. Minipoo would also protect your permanent wave. It came with a disposable mitt to apply the product, and the cost for a 30-shampoo supply was one dollar!1

Dry Shampoo, Is It for You?

If you think dry shampoo might be something you could use from time to time, let us recommend trying it with the Conair® Hair Remedy Dry Shampoo Brush. It can help take the excess labor and potential frustration out of the equation, and make it an enjoyable and successful experience. Plus, you just might get hooked on the scalp massage!

Check out the article titled How to Use Dry Shampoo with the Conair Hair Remedy Dry Shampoo Brush for step-by-step instructions on the process. You can browse through Conair’s complete line of haircare products, including blow dryers, curling irons, hair straighteners, hot rollers and more at Conair.com.

1 Smithsonian National Museum of American History, Minipoo Dry Shampoo
http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_1414219

2 Image: The Englishman In Paris, Courtesy of The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University.